Jackie Nickerson began photographing Zimbabwean farm workers in 1996 as a way to challenge the perception that those who work in African agriculture are disempowered, unmodern people. The resulting series, Farm, focused on the unique and beautiful clothing the workers made for themselves, and by doing so highlighted the worker’s identity, individuality, and ultimately their modernism.
Find out more here.
ZoomInfo
Jackie Nickerson began photographing Zimbabwean farm workers in 1996 as a way to challenge the perception that those who work in African agriculture are disempowered, unmodern people. The resulting series, Farm, focused on the unique and beautiful clothing the workers made for themselves, and by doing so highlighted the worker’s identity, individuality, and ultimately their modernism.
Find out more here.
ZoomInfo
Jackie Nickerson began photographing Zimbabwean farm workers in 1996 as a way to challenge the perception that those who work in African agriculture are disempowered, unmodern people. The resulting series, Farm, focused on the unique and beautiful clothing the workers made for themselves, and by doing so highlighted the worker’s identity, individuality, and ultimately their modernism.
Find out more here.
ZoomInfo
Jackie Nickerson began photographing Zimbabwean farm workers in 1996 as a way to challenge the perception that those who work in African agriculture are disempowered, unmodern people. The resulting series, Farm, focused on the unique and beautiful clothing the workers made for themselves, and by doing so highlighted the worker’s identity, individuality, and ultimately their modernism.
Find out more here.
ZoomInfo
Jackie Nickerson began photographing Zimbabwean farm workers in 1996 as a way to challenge the perception that those who work in African agriculture are disempowered, unmodern people. The resulting series, Farm, focused on the unique and beautiful clothing the workers made for themselves, and by doing so highlighted the worker’s identity, individuality, and ultimately their modernism.
Find out more here.
ZoomInfo
Jackie Nickerson began photographing Zimbabwean farm workers in 1996 as a way to challenge the perception that those who work in African agriculture are disempowered, unmodern people. The resulting series, Farm, focused on the unique and beautiful clothing the workers made for themselves, and by doing so highlighted the worker’s identity, individuality, and ultimately their modernism.
Find out more here.
ZoomInfo
Jackie Nickerson began photographing Zimbabwean farm workers in 1996 as a way to challenge the perception that those who work in African agriculture are disempowered, unmodern people. The resulting series, Farm, focused on the unique and beautiful clothing the workers made for themselves, and by doing so highlighted the worker’s identity, individuality, and ultimately their modernism.
Find out more here.
ZoomInfo
Jackie Nickerson began photographing Zimbabwean farm workers in 1996 as a way to challenge the perception that those who work in African agriculture are disempowered, unmodern people. The resulting series, Farm, focused on the unique and beautiful clothing the workers made for themselves, and by doing so highlighted the worker’s identity, individuality, and ultimately their modernism.
Find out more here.
ZoomInfo
Jackie Nickerson began photographing Zimbabwean farm workers in 1996 as a way to challenge the perception that those who work in African agriculture are disempowered, unmodern people. The resulting series, Farm, focused on the unique and beautiful clothing the workers made for themselves, and by doing so highlighted the worker’s identity, individuality, and ultimately their modernism.
Find out more here.
ZoomInfo

Jackie Nickerson began photographing Zimbabwean farm workers in 1996 as a way to challenge the perception that those who work in African agriculture are disempowered, unmodern people. The resulting series, Farm, focused on the unique and beautiful clothing the workers made for themselves, and by doing so highlighted the worker’s identity, individuality, and ultimately their modernism.

Find out more here.

I love the work of Ugandan photographer Deo Kyakulagira (1940-2000). From the early 1970s until his untimely death in 2000 he operated several photo studios, among them the Central Art Studio Ltd in Kampala Road. He also worked as photographer for the Ministry of Agriculture and for the Department of Medical Illustration at Mulago Hospital. Find out more here and here.
ZoomInfo
I love the work of Ugandan photographer Deo Kyakulagira (1940-2000). From the early 1970s until his untimely death in 2000 he operated several photo studios, among them the Central Art Studio Ltd in Kampala Road. He also worked as photographer for the Ministry of Agriculture and for the Department of Medical Illustration at Mulago Hospital. Find out more here and here.
ZoomInfo

I love the work of Ugandan photographer Deo Kyakulagira (1940-2000). From the early 1970s until his untimely death in 2000 he operated several photo studios, among them the Central Art Studio Ltd in Kampala Road. He also worked as photographer for the Ministry of Agriculture and for the Department of Medical Illustration at Mulago Hospital. Find out more here and here.

theskimminestfeminist:

dynamicafrica:

theblackme:

Nigerian artisan Ojo Obaniyi from Ibadan has applied his skill in weaving in an unusually creative way to advertise his business.
Obaniyi, who has practiced the craft for 20 years, has covered the interior and exterior of his Volkswagen pickup with raffia palm cane, including the entire car body, the wheel caps, chairs, steering wheel and dashboard in an effort to attract attention from passersby.
Obaniyi says of his handiwork:
 ’I wanted to prove a point that it is not only the educated elite that can make positive changes in society. We, the artisans also have talents toeffect a change and make a positive impact in the society. 
That is why I decided that I too must do something that will make people to recognize me and know me across the whole world and by extension prove to the world that African and indeed the entire black race have very talented people.’


Dope.
ZoomInfo
theskimminestfeminist:

dynamicafrica:

theblackme:

Nigerian artisan Ojo Obaniyi from Ibadan has applied his skill in weaving in an unusually creative way to advertise his business.
Obaniyi, who has practiced the craft for 20 years, has covered the interior and exterior of his Volkswagen pickup with raffia palm cane, including the entire car body, the wheel caps, chairs, steering wheel and dashboard in an effort to attract attention from passersby.
Obaniyi says of his handiwork:
 ’I wanted to prove a point that it is not only the educated elite that can make positive changes in society. We, the artisans also have talents toeffect a change and make a positive impact in the society. 
That is why I decided that I too must do something that will make people to recognize me and know me across the whole world and by extension prove to the world that African and indeed the entire black race have very talented people.’


Dope.
ZoomInfo
theskimminestfeminist:

dynamicafrica:

theblackme:

Nigerian artisan Ojo Obaniyi from Ibadan has applied his skill in weaving in an unusually creative way to advertise his business.
Obaniyi, who has practiced the craft for 20 years, has covered the interior and exterior of his Volkswagen pickup with raffia palm cane, including the entire car body, the wheel caps, chairs, steering wheel and dashboard in an effort to attract attention from passersby.
Obaniyi says of his handiwork:
 ’I wanted to prove a point that it is not only the educated elite that can make positive changes in society. We, the artisans also have talents toeffect a change and make a positive impact in the society. 
That is why I decided that I too must do something that will make people to recognize me and know me across the whole world and by extension prove to the world that African and indeed the entire black race have very talented people.’


Dope.
ZoomInfo
theskimminestfeminist:

dynamicafrica:

theblackme:

Nigerian artisan Ojo Obaniyi from Ibadan has applied his skill in weaving in an unusually creative way to advertise his business.
Obaniyi, who has practiced the craft for 20 years, has covered the interior and exterior of his Volkswagen pickup with raffia palm cane, including the entire car body, the wheel caps, chairs, steering wheel and dashboard in an effort to attract attention from passersby.
Obaniyi says of his handiwork:
 ’I wanted to prove a point that it is not only the educated elite that can make positive changes in society. We, the artisans also have talents toeffect a change and make a positive impact in the society. 
That is why I decided that I too must do something that will make people to recognize me and know me across the whole world and by extension prove to the world that African and indeed the entire black race have very talented people.’


Dope.
ZoomInfo

theskimminestfeminist:

dynamicafrica:

theblackme:

Nigerian artisan Ojo Obaniyi from Ibadan has applied his skill in weaving in an unusually creative way to advertise his business.

Obaniyi, who has practiced the craft for 20 years, has covered the interior and exterior of his Volkswagen pickup with raffia palm cane, including the entire car body, the wheel caps, chairs, steering wheel and dashboard in an effort to attract attention from passersby.

Obaniyi says of his handiwork:

 ’I wanted to prove a point that it is not only the educated elite that can make positive changes in society. We, the artisans also have talents to
effect a change and make a positive impact in the society.

That is why I decided that I too must do something that will make people to recognize me and know me across the whole world and by extension prove to the world that African and indeed the entire black race have very talented people.’

Dope.

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Crafting Kenya Gains Momentum!

Crafting Kenya’s photographer has been announced! Anthony Bourasseau is both a professional pharmacist who works as a pharmaceutical advisor for governments and International Development organizations around the world, and a talented photographer. 

His photography has been featured in international publications such as Bouts du Monde (a French travel magazine), Lonely Planet, and Medicins Sans Frontiere’s publications.
Contribute to the project here.
If you are in Nairobi, attend the Quiz night!

Crafting Kenya | Photographic journey of Kenya’s arts & crafts.

This September, Wanja Laiboni will travel throughout Kenya, with a professional photographer documenting and studying Kenya’s diverse traditional crafts. She aims to collect the stories behind the crafts, the inspiration for their colors and symbols, and the materials and techniques used. The objective is to cover as much ground as possible, ensuring that the wealth of Kenya’s crafts is captured in images and word. The final project delivery is a professionally designed, digital compilation of Kenya’s crafts.
Help make it happen! http://bit.ly/craftingKenya